Choosing Florals Based on Your Client’s Needs

By Michelle Ecker on June 7th, 2017
Choosing Florals Based on Your Client’s Needs

As a floral designer, it’s important for you to articulate the goal of your arrangement before you start planning it and putting it together. If you’re a student in our online floral design course, you should be familiar with this process of concepting out a project both with yourself and with your clients.

If you’re not really sure what we mean when we refer to the ‘goal’ of your bouquet, you can get started by checking out the 5 examples listed below:

I want my bouquet to smell good.

If fragrance is what you’re going for, there are a handful of picks that will add some awesome aroma to the area where they’re displayed. While this might be distracting or overshadowed at a large event like a dinner where smells of food can overlap and distract, this is a great idea for an arrangement that will be displayed in a master bathroom for a residential interior client for example. For this project, try: Daphne, Sweat Pea, Lilac, Honeysuckle or Geranium.

I want my bouquet to look understated and delicate.

If you like the elegant simplicity of a more minimalistic arrangement, you should try working with: Poppy, Cosmo, Godetia, Anemone or Pansy.

I want my bouquet to have some flair.

Are you putting together a centerpiece arrangement for an especially stylish, flamboyant couple who want something special and showy on display? They would probably love the panache of a single accent flower stealing the show. For this fun look, try working with: Foxglove, Veronica, Snapdragon or Lupine.

I like a bouquet that looks more classic.

If you’re working with a much more classic couple with traditional taste in things like roses, there are a few similar options you could explore with them. Try suggesting things like: Ranunculus, Dahlia or Peony.

I like arrangements that include lots of greenery.

If you love the natural, overgrown and earthy look of an arrangement that features a lot of added greenery (typically ferns), there are a handful of other pretty options worth exploring. Try: Eucalyptus, Mint or Begonia.


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